That Blue Square Thing

E-Safety Screensaver

This task is about producing a publication that's suitable for a specific audience. In this case the audience is 5 to 7 year olds - that's Years 1 to 3 in primary school.

That audience is difficult to produce things for because it can't read very well. You need to remember this and keep it in mind as you're working through this piece of work.

The Task

Design and create a screensaver suitable for 5 to 7 year olds. The screensaver will be used in schools and should remind the children to take care online.

The screensaver needs to feature an e-safety friend you have created. This could be a human ('Safety Sally' maybe?), an animal of some kind ('Cyber Squirrel' perhaps?) or some other kind of friend. You must design and create a suitable friend first.

A screensaver is an on-screen publication, so the best software choice for this task is probably PowerPoint.

The screensaver needs to:

Part One - the E-Safety Friend

Start by thinking about the e-safety friend. What sort of friend will you create?

1. The target audience - jot down what you know about the target audience. What sort of character might appeal to them?

2. Gather information - it might be a good idea to do some research on what sort of characters 5 to 7 year olds like.

Hint: make sure your character appeals to both boys and girls. Any hint of pink whatsoever and both of my sons would immediately have hated the character!

3. Design - jot some ideas for your e-safety friend down, perhaps with a sketch. What will they look like? What sorts of colours? Remember, they need to be fun for 5 year olds.

4. Make it - now make a first copy of the e-safety friend.

5. Get some feedback - get at least three people to look at your friend. What do they think? Write down who they are and what they said about your creation.

Remember, the aim of getting feedback is to improve your work. You want useful feedback, so don't just ask people who you think will say that your work is ace even if it's not!

6. Improve it - you've got feedback, now improve the friend if you can.

Part Two - the Screensaver

1. The target audience - jot down what you know about the target audience. How do children use computers at that age? What sorts of advice might they need?

2. Gather information - what sorts of e-safety advice is there for 5 to 7 year olds?

This animation (originally from the BBC) starring Dongle the Rabbit is aimed at this sort of age group. It might be a good starting place
This BBC news article introduces a CEOP campaign aimed at young children.

3. Design - storyboards are a really good way to plan out a screensaver or other on-screen publication. Try and include details such as colours and what writing will go on each slide

PDF iconStoryboard template - to download, print and write on by hand

4. Make it - now make a first copy of the screensaver. Remember the target audience.

5. Get some feedback - get at least three people to look at your screensaver. What do they think? Write down who they are and what they said.

Remember, the aim of getting feedback is to improve your work. You want useful feedback, so don't just ask people who you think will say that your work is ace even if it's not!

6. Improve it - you've got feedback, now improve the friend if you can.

7. Evaluate it - use the evaluation sheet below to reflect on your work.

MS Word iconScreensaver evaluation sheet